Is It Better to Wash Your Clothes Inside Out?

“Kobe!”

That’s me most of the time whenever I throw my soiled clothes straight onto the laundry basket after a long day when I was a kid. I would get all proud and grin for a second after my successful “shot.”

To be honest, I couldn’t care less whether they were inside out or the right way before I toss them. Then I remembered how my mom would always turn most clothes inside out before she does the laundry. How about you? Do you usually turn your clothes inside out before throwing them in the washer too?

Washing Clothes Inside Out (Less Friction, Less Damage)

Friction is both an enemy and a friend during the wash cycle; you have to use it to your advantage. When you wash clothes inside out, you reduce the friction on the outside part of the clothes, thereby reducing damage to your garment’s outside features. You would want to wash your clothes inside out because friction is expected between your clothes and the washing machine’s walls. 

Turning clothes inside out before tossing them in the washer is the easiest way you can reduce friction during a wash. By doing so, you can prolong the look and feel of each garment. Friction during washing leads to a rough hand feel and pilling or fuzziness on the fabric. It’s not an ideal sight and can make your garment look worn out.

To Avoid Color Fading Especially for Denim and Dark Clothes

Colors on fabrics fade over time and more so when they are constantly exposed to friction during washing. Turning your clothes from the inside out prolongs the color and print of the fabric, even when you wash them frequently. Hence, clothes look their best and would last longer, even if you wear them most of the time.

This is especially true for denim jeans and dark clothes. When you wash these types of clothes with the right side out, you risk the chance of leaving white streak marks from color fading. Washing them from the inside out and hanging them the same way (inside out) under direct sunlight saves them from discoloration.

Here’s a helpful tip when washing new colored shirts: if you are not sure if the colors would bleed, make sure that the other garments are turned inside out before you begin the cycle. So in case the new shirt bleeds, it won’t affect the other garments that much.

To Protect the Print and To Keep Ribbons and Buttons from Coming Loose

I usually find the time to hand wash my delicates, including clothes with intricate ribbons or beadwork. However, not all of us have the time to hand wash our shirts so we rely on the delicate setting on the washer instead. 

If you are washing delicates or clothes with ribbons and buttons, they become loose when you wash them. Turning your garments inside out is a necessary step before you run them on the wash cycle. 

You may also put the garments in a mesh bag to prevent further friction from ruining the design and color of the fabric and make them last longer. You also avoid the possible tangles the ribbons may cause by doing so. After washing, you can then air dry your shirts or hang them outside and let the sun do the work.

Washing Your Clothes Dirty Side Out (To Actually Remove The Dirt)

When you think about it, usually the dirty side of our garment is the inside. It is more exposed to dirt, sweat, and grime from your body all throughout the day. You shouldn’t worry that the outside of your shirt will remain dirty after washing. The detergent should lift the stains from water-soluble substances, even if they were washed inside out.

On another note, some of us are more exposed to dirt, mud, and grime depending on our work or activity. If your clothes have hard-to-remove stains on the outside, you may soak them with DIY or store-bought stain remover. If the stains persist, you can then wash your clothes with the outside part or dirty side exposed so you could actually remove the dirt. 

Aside from heavily soiled fabrics, bed sheets also need to be washed with the printed side up. This is because the dirt and grime on bed sheets are usually found on top of the fabric and not on the inside.

Summary

It doesn’t take long for you to turn your clothes inside out before you toss them in the washing machine. Turning your clothes inside out is necessary if you want to avoid color fading and protect your garment’s features. It can also keep your clothes looking better for longer. 

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About Margaret Croom

Peggy is a contributor and editor at Tidy Diary. She is a proud mother of three children who inspired her to level up her tidying skills. She enjoys her me time by lounging in her favorite nook with a lovely cup of tea. She also keeps a handy diary.